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Sunapee Town Seal
 
Fire Department & Emergency Medical Services
Contact TypeContact Information
Contact:
(603) 763-5770
Web Manager
Address:
9 Sargent Road
P.O. Box 15
Sunapee, NH 03782-0015
Dispatch:
(603) 763-5555 Emergency- 911
Sunapee Safety Services - Fire Phone (not manned)
(603) 763-5770 Emergency- 911
Georges Mills Station Phone (not manned)
(603) 763-5238 Emergency-911
Fax:
(603) 763-7358
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Sunapee Fire Department Members Present and Recieve Several Awards-

At the 2016 Annual Sunapee Fire Department dinner Captain Richard Osborne, Captain of the Tanker Company was presented with Firefighter of the Year Award.  The Selection Committee chose Capt. Osborne because of his years of dedicated service and devotion to the Sunapee Fire Department.  Richard has worked his way up through the ranks of the department, and is currently Captain of the Tanker Company, a position held by his father, Artie, until his passing.

Captain/EMT-I Steven Marshall was awarded a pin and certificate for 20 years of service on the Department.

The Committee also selected Rhonda Gurney as the Sunapee Citizen of the Year.  Ms. Gurney was nominated and selected due to her long term service to the Town where she serves on the Recreation Committee.  In that role she was instrumental in establishing the Sunapee Green-Up Day, as well as the Magic in the Harbor activities.  

The Department has also been notified by the NH Police, Fire & EMS Foundation (www.nhpfef.com) that two members have been selected to receive recognition awards at the annual banquet on April 20 at the Radisson in Manchester.  

Firefighter/EMT Darryl Sencabaugh will be receiving the Lifesaving Award:
On the evening of January 18, 2016 he responded to an unconscious male at the Sunapee High School.  The patient, a longtime school teacher and coach at the Sunapee High School, was about to give one of his students a ride home.  This young student witnessed his coach go into full cardiac arrest and had the where-with-all to activate the 911 system, which also helped save the patient' life.

First on scene was Firefighter/EMT Darryl Sencabaugh who immediately initiated CPR and continued care as others members of the EMS Company, police department and New London Ambulance arrived on scene.  Through his efforts, and the efforts of all the emergency personnel on site, the outcome of the patient was a positive one and is on the road to recovery.

Captain/EMT-I Steven Marshall will be presented with a Lifetime Achievement Award:
As noted on the award certificate from the foundation,  on the evening of January 18, 2016 he responded to an unconscious male at the Sunapee High School.  The patient, a longtime school teacher and coach at the Sunapee High School, was about to give one of his students a ride home.  This young student witnessed his coach go into full cardiac arrest and had the where-with-all to activate the 911 system, which also helped save the patient' life.

On scene were Firefighter/EMT Darryl Sencabaugh and Fire Captain/ EMT-I Steven Marshall, who started CPR on the patient.   Through their efforts, along with other members of the EMS Company, and continuing chain of care providers, the outcome of the patient was a positive one and he is on the road to recovery.

Fire Captain/EMT-I Marshall is the Police Chief for the Town of Washington and retired at the end of March after 33 years of service in NH.  

Fire Captain/EMT-I Steven Marshall has been an extensive proponent of Emergency Medical Services and has been a volunteer with the Sunapee Fire and Rescue Department for over 20 years. He is also the Sunapee Company Clerk, Web Site Administrator, Cold Water Rescue Trainer, MAXX/ATV Operator and member of the Board of Directors for the Sunapee Fire Department Association.

Fire Captain/EMT-I Marshall has served as a ski patroller at Mt. Sunapee Resort for 15 years, has been a CPR instructor for the American Heart Association and assistant EMS instructor for over 20 years.  Fire Captain/EMT-I Marshall spent many summers mentoring cadets in the NH Police Academy Summer cadet program.  He was instrumental in the grant writing for Washington and Sunapee to obtain necessary equipment.




Smoke and CO Detectors Save Lives!
Test your detectors monthly.
Have a plan for exiting your home in case of an emergency.
When you change your clocks an hour forward or backward, don’t forget to change your smoke and CO detector batteries!

Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives.
Fire Prevention Week is October 5-11, 2014. This year’s topic concentrates on Smoke Alarms. Did you know that many people don’t test their smoke alarms as often as they should? When there is a fire, smoke spreads fast. You need working smoke alarms to give you time to get out. Test yours every month!

Fast Facts  (from the National Fire Protection Association)

Home fires
•In 2011, U.S. fire departments responded to 370,000 home structure fires. These fires caused 13,910 civilian injuries, 2,520 civilian deaths, $6.9 billion in direct damage.
•On average, seven people died in U.S. home fires per day from 2007 to 2011.
•Cooking is the leading cause home fires and home fire injuries, followed heating equipment.
•Smoking is a leading cause of civilian home fire deaths.
•Most fatal fires kill one or two people. In 2012, 8 home fires killed five or more people resulting in a total of 44 deaths.

Smoke alarms
•Almost three of five (60%) of reported home fire deaths in 2007 to 2011 resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
•Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
•In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 93% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 79% of the time.
•When smoke alarms fail to operate, it is usually because batteries are missing, disconnected, or dead.
•An ionization smoke alarm is generally more responsive to flaming fires and a photoelectric smoke alarm is generally more responsive to smoldering fires. For the best protection, or where extra time is needed, to awaken or assist others, both types of alarms, or combination ionization and photoelectric alarms are recommended.

 
Town of Sunapee  23 Edgemont Road, Sunapee, NH 03782  Ph: (603) 763-2212
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